Diaspora Co Panneer Rose (1.49 oz)
$24.00

Diaspora Co

Panneer Rose

SKU: 47328

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Details

Diaspora Co's rose petals are organically grown by Parvathi Menon and her wonderful team on a 10 acre farm heaving with an abundance of bananas, limes, avocados and rain-fed turmeric in northern Tamil Nadu. After two years of trial and error, Parvathi finally figured out how to grow the Damask Rose (or Panneer Rose in Tamil), that whilst prized for being incredibly fragrant, is also known to be extremely delicate and very high maintenance, especially when grown regeneratively, without pesticides. Since the rose petals need to be processed everyday when they are perfectly in bloom, Parvathi designed an ingenious solar powered dehydration system that is just gentle enough to help the petals retain their deep colouring and lock in their renowned fragrance. They’ve been grinding small batches into their coffee beans, topping desserts with these bursts of pink, and even steeping them in cream for a little floral joy.

More

- Shelf life: Over 36 months.
- Ethically sourced.
- No added hormones.
- No added nitrates or nitrites.
- No antibiotics.
- No preservatives
- Non-GMO.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Ingredients + Benefits

100% Whole Rose Petals.

Ingredients may be subject to change. The most accurate and up to date product ingredient list can also found on the product packaging.

Brand Info

Diaspora Co. Spices was founded to radically re-imagine the spice trade: investing money, equity and power into the best regenerative spice farms across South Asia, and bringing wildly delicious, hella potent flavors into your home cooking. They're a queer, woman of color owned & led biz, so beyond championing gorgeous heirloom spice varieties, they're committed to creating something for us, by us. Deepening what “Made in South Asia'' can mean, and how they tell stories of freedom, struggle, and diaspora through food.

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